/** * REST API: WP_REST_Response class * * @package WordPress * @subpackage REST_API * @since 4.4.0 */ /** * Core class used to implement a REST response object. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @see WP_HTTP_Response */ class WP_REST_Response extends WP_HTTP_Response { /** * Links related to the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * @var array */ protected $links = array(); /** * The route that was to create the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * @var string */ protected $matched_route = ''; /** * The handler that was used to create the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * @var null|array */ protected $matched_handler = null; /** * Adds a link to the response. * * @internal The $rel parameter is first, as this looks nicer when sending multiple. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @link https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5988 * @link https://www.iana.org/assignments/link-relations/link-relations.xml * * @param string $rel Link relation. Either an IANA registered type, * or an absolute URL. * @param string $href Target URI for the link. * @param array $attributes Optional. Link parameters to send along with the URL. Default empty array. */ public function add_link( $rel, $href, $attributes = array() ) { if ( empty( $this->links[ $rel ] ) ) { $this->links[ $rel ] = array(); } if ( isset( $attributes['href'] ) ) { // Remove the href attribute, as it's used for the main URL. unset( $attributes['href'] ); } $this->links[ $rel ][] = array( 'href' => $href, 'attributes' => $attributes, ); } /** * Removes a link from the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @param string $rel Link relation. Either an IANA registered type, or an absolute URL. * @param string $href Optional. Only remove links for the relation matching the given href. * Default null. */ public function remove_link( $rel, $href = null ) { if ( ! isset( $this->links[ $rel ] ) ) { return; } if ( $href ) { $this->links[ $rel ] = wp_list_filter( $this->links[ $rel ], array( 'href' => $href ), 'NOT' ); } else { $this->links[ $rel ] = array(); } if ( ! $this->links[ $rel ] ) { unset( $this->links[ $rel ] ); } } /** * Adds multiple links to the response. * * Link data should be an associative array with link relation as the key. * The value can either be an associative array of link attributes * (including `href` with the URL for the response), or a list of these * associative arrays. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @param array $links Map of link relation to list of links. */ public function add_links( $links ) { foreach ( $links as $rel => $set ) { // If it's a single link, wrap with an array for consistent handling. if ( isset( $set['href'] ) ) { $set = array( $set ); } foreach ( $set as $attributes ) { $this->add_link( $rel, $attributes['href'], $attributes ); } } } /** * Retrieves links for the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @return array List of links. */ public function get_links() { return $this->links; } /** * Sets a single link header. * * @internal The $rel parameter is first, as this looks nicer when sending multiple. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @link https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5988 * @link https://www.iana.org/assignments/link-relations/link-relations.xml * * @param string $rel Link relation. Either an IANA registered type, or an absolute URL. * @param string $link Target IRI for the link. * @param array $other Optional. Other parameters to send, as an assocative array. * Default empty array. */ public function link_header( $rel, $link, $other = array() ) { $header = '<' . $link . '>; rel="' . $rel . '"'; foreach ( $other as $key => $value ) { if ( 'title' === $key ) { $value = '"' . $value . '"'; } $header .= '; ' . $key . '=' . $value; } $this->header( 'Link', $header, false ); } /** * Retrieves the route that was used. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @return string The matched route. */ public function get_matched_route() { return $this->matched_route; } /** * Sets the route (regex for path) that caused the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @param string $route Route name. */ public function set_matched_route( $route ) { $this->matched_route = $route; } /** * Retrieves the handler that was used to generate the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @return null|array The handler that was used to create the response. */ public function get_matched_handler() { return $this->matched_handler; } /** * Retrieves the handler that was responsible for generating the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @param array $handler The matched handler. */ public function set_matched_handler( $handler ) { $this->matched_handler = $handler; } /** * Checks if the response is an error, i.e. >= 400 response code. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @return bool Whether the response is an error. */ public function is_error() { return $this->get_status() >= 400; } /** * Retrieves a WP_Error object from the response. * * @since 4.4.0 * * @return WP_Error|null WP_Error or null on not an errored response. */ public function as_error() { if ( ! $this->is_error() ) { return null; } $error = new WP_Error; if ( is_array( $this->get_data() ) ) { $data = $this->get_data(); $error->add( $data['code'], $data['message'], $data['data'] ); if ( ! empty( $data['additional_errors'] ) ) { foreach( $data['additional_errors'] as $err ) { $error->add( $err['code'], $err['message'], $err['data'] ); } } } else { $error->add( $this->get_status(), '', array( 'status' => $this->get_status() ) ); } return $error; } /** * Retrieves the CURIEs (compact URIs) used for relations. * * @since 4.5.0 * * @return array Compact URIs. */ public function get_curies() { $curies = array( array( 'name' => 'wp', 'href' => 'https://api.w.org/{rel}', 'templated' => true, ), ); /** * Filters extra CURIEs available on API responses. * * CURIEs allow a shortened version of URI relations. This allows a more * usable form for custom relations than using the full URI. These work * similarly to how XML namespaces work. * * Registered CURIES need to specify a name and URI template. This will * automatically transform URI relations into their shortened version. * The shortened relation follows the format `{name}:{rel}`. `{rel}` in * the URI template will be replaced with the `{rel}` part of the * shortened relation. * * For example, a CURIE with name `example` and URI template * `http://w.org/{rel}` would transform a `http://w.org/term` relation * into `example:term`. * * Well-behaved clients should expand and normalise these back to their * full URI relation, however some naive clients may not resolve these * correctly, so adding new CURIEs may break backward compatibility. * * @since 4.5.0 * * @param array $additional Additional CURIEs to register with the API. */ $additional = apply_filters( 'rest_response_link_curies', array() ); return array_merge( $curies, $additional ); } } Personality Assessments | You Matter Life Coaching

Personality Assessments

My Personality Assessment – I/D/S

I have found that I am an innovator when it comes to change.  Flexibility is key and change is good, being stagnant is not that appealing. I appreciate change and the possibilities that could occur…or be learned from. Rocking the boat, learning a new technique, stepping out in uncertainty, exploring new roads, smiling at a stranger, doing something different from the old cliche “that’s how it’s always been done” and asking why instead of just complying, going to see a movie on a school night, starting a book club or a favorite activity group, trying a new dish at a new restaurant, talking to a stranger about Jesus…yes, change is good. Innovate, Innovate, Innovate.

As for the value of self-awareness for me personally, the graphs taught me that I have some “C’ characteristics, but I really am an “I/D/S” at various times and feel that this is a good blend. I love organization!!!   Professionally speaking, I can incorporate all personality aspects when needed and when applicable because of education and training.


My Meyers-Briggs Assessment – ESFJ

Portrait of an ESFJ – The Caregiver

ESFJs are people persons – they love people. They are warmly interested in others. They use their Sensing and Judging characteristics to gather specific, detailed information about others, and turn this information into supportive judgments. They have a special skill at bringing out the best in others. They are extremely good at reading others, and understanding their point of view. The ESFJ’s desire for everything to be pleasant makes them highly supportive of others. People like to be around ESFJs, because the ESFJ has a special gift of invariably making people feel good about themselves.

The ESFJ takes their responsibilities very seriously and are very dependable. They value security and stability, and have a strong focus on the details of life. They see before others do what needs to be done, and do whatever it takes to make sure that it gets done. They enjoy these types of tasks, and are extremely good at them.

ESFJs are warm and energetic. They are hurt by indifference and don’t understand unkindness. They are very giving people, who get a lot of their personal satisfaction from the happiness of others. They want to be appreciated for who they are, and what they give. They’re very sensitive to others, and freely give practical care. ESFJs are such caring individuals, that they sometimes have a hard time seeing or accepting a difficult truth about someone they care about. With Extraverted Feeling dominating their personality, ESFJs are good at reading other people.

ESFJs have a strong value system that is ethical and centered around genuine goodness. They are most likely be the kindest, most generous souls who will gladly give you the shirt off of their back without a second thought. The selfless quality of their personality type is genuine and pure. The ESFJ believes in the integrity and they’re usually quite popular and good with people. ESFJs are most comfortable with structured environments. They enjoy creating order and structure, and are very good at tasks which require these kinds of skills.

ESFJs respect and believe in the laws and rules of authority, and believe that others should do so as well. They’re traditional, and prefer to do things in the established way, rather than venturing into unchartered territory. Their need for security drives their ready acceptance and adherence to the policies of the established system. ESFJs are warm, sympathetic, helpful, cooperative, tactful, down-to-earth, practical, thorough, consistent, organized, enthusiastic, and energetic. They enjoy tradition and security, and seek stable lives for them and the people around them.